Saturday, 15 June 2013

No.
Animal
Home
Young one
Sound
1
Lion
Den
Cub
Roar
2
Dog
Kennel
PUPPY
Bark
3
Cat
Cage
Kitten
Mew
4
Sheep
Pen
Lamb
Bleat
5
Bull
Cattle shed
Calf
Moo
6
Elephant
Jungle
Baby elephant
Trumpet
7
Hen
Coop
Chick
Clucks
8
Goose
Water
Gosling
Squawk
9
Deer
Grasslands
Fawn
Grunt
10
Horse
Stable
Foal
Neigh
11
Cow
Cattle shed
Calf
Moo moo
12
Bear
Large forests
Cub
Growl
13
Cock
Pen
chick
cock a doodle doo
14
Rat
Hole
Kitten, nestling, pup, pinkie
Squeak
15
Bird
Nest
Nestling
Chirp
16
Monkey
Trees
Infant
Chatter
17
Pig
Sty
Piglet
Oink oink
18
Rabbit
Burrow
Bunny
Grunt
19
Fish
Water
Small fish

20
Donkey
Stable
Mule
Bray
21
Goat
Pen
Kid

22
Duck
Water
Duckling
Quack
23
Bee
Beehive
Worker bee
Ooom
24
Spider
Web
Small spider

25
Snake
Burrow

Hiss
26
Ant
Hill


27
Man
House
child
Speak
28
Zebra
Zoo
Small zebra


Thursday, 27 December 2012

Object Pronouns


Object Pronouns
The seven basic pronouns have one form when they are used as subjects and another form when they are used as objects.
Subjects are what the sentence is about.
Objects are what is affected by the action of the subject.
  • I like whisky. (I is the subject).
  • I read books. (Books is the object as it is receiving the action).
PRONOUNS
Subject Pronoun
Object Pronoun
I
Me
You
You
He
Him
She
Her
It
It
We
Us
You (plural)
You
They
Them

Object pronouns are used instead of nouns, usually because we already know what the object is. It makes the sentence easier to read and understand and avoids repetition. We normally use object pronouns after a verb or a preposition.

Examples
I like horses.
Subject Pronoun
Horses don't like me.
Object Pronoun


We talk to our neighbour.
Subject Pronoun
She talks to us.
Object Pronoun


They listen to the teacher.
Subject Pronoun
Listen to me carefully.
Object Pronoun


You speak very quickly.
Subject Pronoun
We watch them on TV.
Object Pronoun

The Object Pronoun - it
Be careful when using 'it' as an object pronoun because it is only in the correct context that it has meaning. It needs to have already been mentioned or obvious to the listener what you are referring to. Compare;
  • You are sitting on it! (The listener probably doesn't know what the speaker refers to).
  • The letter is on the sofa. You are sitting on it! (It is obvious in the second sentence that the reference is to the letter)

Possessive Pronouns


Possessive Pronouns
Possessive pronouns are used in English to avoid repeating information that is already clear. In general it makes the sentence less confusing because the same information is not being repeated.
This book is my book, not your book. (Sounds repetitive)
This book is mine, not yours. (Mine and yours are possessive pronouns)
In the sentence, mine is a possessive pronoun that replaces my book.
In the sentence, yours is a possessive pronoun that replaces your book.
The possessive pronouns in English are as follows:
Subject
Possessive
Pronouns
I
Mine
You
Yours
He
His
She
Hers
It
Its
We
Ours
You (pl)
Yours
They
Theirs

Examples:
  • I didn't have my umbrella so Marta lent me hers.
    (I didn't have my umbrella so Marta lent me her umbrella).
  • Her car is faster than mine.
    (Her car is faster than my car).
  • That food is ours and not theirs.
    (That food is our food and not their food).
  • I know this drink is yours but I need to drink something.
    (I know this drink is your drink but I need to drink something).
Remember that with possessive pronouns there are no apostrophes (').

Of yours
It is also very common to say a friend/some friends + of + possessive pronouns.
  • I saw one of your friends last night.
    I saw a friend of yours last night.
Both of these sentences are correct and both common in English.

Yours faithfully - Yours sincerely
Yours is also used in English with faithfully or sincerely at the end of a formal letter or e-mail. The two common expressions are:
  • Yours faithfully (If it someone that you don't know)
  • Yours sincerely (If it is someone that you know)